Tips on Travel While Giving to Charity

Do you plan to donate your services to charity this summer? Will you travel as part of the service? If so, some travel expenses may help lower your taxes when you file your tax return next year. Here are five tax tips you should know if you travel while giving your services to charity.

1. You can’t deduct the value of your services that you give to charity. But you may be able to deduct some out-of-pocket costs you pay to give your services. This can include the cost of travel. All out-of pocket costs must be:

  • unreimbursed,
  • directly connected with the services,
  • expenses you had only because of the services you gave, and
  • not personal, living or family expenses.

2. Your volunteer work must be for a qualified charity. Most groups other than churches and governments must apply to the IRS to become qualified. Ask the group about its IRS status before you donate. You can also use the Select Check tool on IRS.gov to check the group’s status.

3. Some types of travel do not qualify for a tax deduction. For example, you can’t deduct your costs if a significant part of the trip involves recreation or a vacation. For more on these rules see Publication 526, Charitable Contributions.


4. You can deduct your travel expenses if your work is real and substantial throughout the trip. You can’t deduct expenses if you only have nominal duties or do not have any duties for significant parts of the trip.

5. Deductible travel expenses may include:

  • air, rail and bus transportation,
  • car expenses,
  • lodging costs,
  • the cost of meals, and
  • taxi or other transportation costs between the airport or station and your hotel.

For additional help with figuring out you eligible charitable deductions, please contact our office at 800-560-4NFS (4637).

Wrentham, Norfolk, Plainville, Franklin, Walpole, income tax, tax calculator, hr, irs forms, Jackson Hewitt, tax, tax act, tax return, tax brackets, income tax return, tax refund, taxes, accountant, h&r, tax return calculator, tax forms, free tax filing, federal income tax, federal tax forms, federal tax return, tax online, tax returns, online tax return, irs e file, tax return status, file taxes online, tax preparation, income tax return online, instant tax services, accountants, income tax filing, income tax forms, federal tax, estimate tax return, taxes online, online tax filing, tax services, federal taxes, what is income tax, tax filing, tax questions, online tax, e filing income tax, irs free file, free tax preparation, filing taxes, file taxes, state taxes, tax accountant, h and r, tax planning, free tax return, free federal tax filing, online taxes, free state tax filing, free online tax filing, federal income tax forms, tax help, free tax, how to file taxes, tax preparer, tax consultant, free taxes, income tax returns, complete tax, federal tax forms, free taxes online, income taxes, income tax return efiling, free efile, h&r, tax advisor, tax advice, best place to do taxes in wrentham, wrentham tax, wrentham tax planner, wrentham tax prep, wrentham income, wrentham income tax, wrentham accountant, wrentham accounting

Social Security Trust Fund Reserve Gains One Year for Projected Depletion Date

By now, you’ve probably heard that this year marks the 80th anniversary of the signing of the Social Security Act.  In case you didn’t know, this year is also the 75th anniversary of the payment of the first monthly benefits.

And, today, the Social Security Board of Trustees released the 75th annual report to Congress on the financial status of the Social Security trust funds.

As a quick refresher: The Social Security trust funds include the Old Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) fund and the Disability Insurance (DI) fund. Benefits to retired workers and their families, and to families of deceased workers, are paid from the OASI trust fund. Benefits to disabled workers and their families are paid from the DI trust fund.

The report shows that, combined, the funds now have an additional year – from 2033 to 2034 – before their reserves are depleted. The Old Age and Survivors fund alone also gets an extra year from 2034 to 2035.

Some factors that led to this improvement include (1) faster growth in average wages in the future, because of slower growth in employees’ private health insurance cost – due at least in part to provisions of the Affordable Care Act, and (2) improvements in how we project the earnings of American workers by age.

The DI fund is still projected to deplete its reserves late in 2016. After that, the income collected through taxes will be enough to pay only 81 percent of the scheduled benefits. So, an adjustment to maintain full disability benefits is needed soon.


The president has proposed temporarily reallocating more of the total Social Security payroll tax rate to the disability fund to give Congress more time to consider comprehensive changes to the Social Security program as a whole.

The Social Security program is sustainable, but needs some adjustments. To keep the  program solvent after 2034, Congress could choose to increase payroll taxes by about one-third, reduce benefits by about one-fourth, or make some combination of these or other adjustments.

Because of the importance of Social Security to all Americans, we can be confident that Congress will make timely and well-considered adjustments, just as they have whenever needed since 1935.

Social Security Matters – 

Wrentham, Norfolk, Plainville, Franklin, Walpole, income tax, tax calculator, hr, irs forms, Jackson Hewitt, tax, tax act, tax return, tax brackets, income tax return, tax refund, taxes, accountant, h&r, tax return calculator, tax forms, free tax filing, federal income tax, federal tax forms, federal tax return, tax online, tax returns, online tax return, irs e file, tax return status, file taxes online, tax preparation, income tax return online, instant tax services, accountants, income tax filing, income tax forms, federal tax, estimate tax return, taxes online, online tax filing, tax services, federal taxes, what is income tax, tax filing, tax questions, online tax, e filing income tax, irs free file, free tax preparation, filing taxes, file taxes, state taxes, tax accountant, h and r, tax planning, free tax return, free federal tax filing, online taxes, free state tax filing, free online tax filing, federal income tax forms, tax help, free tax, how to file taxes, tax preparer, tax consultant, free taxes, income tax returns, complete tax, federal tax forms, free taxes online, income taxes, income tax return efiling, free efile, h&r, tax advisor, tax advice, best place to do taxes in wrentham, wrentham tax, wrentham tax planner, wrentham tax prep, wrentham income, wrentham income tax, wrentham accountant, wrentham accounting

Five Basic Tax Tips for New Businesses

If you start a business, one key to success is to know about your federal tax obligations. You may need to know not only about income taxes but also about payroll taxes. Here are five basic tax tips that can help get your business off to a good start.

  1. Business Structure.  As you start out, you’ll need to choose the structure of your business. Some common types include sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. You may also choose to be an S corporation or Limited Liability Company. You’ll report your business activity using the IRS forms which are right for your business type.
  2. Business Taxes.  There are four general types of business taxes. They are income tax, self-employment tax, employment tax and excise tax. The type of taxes your business pays usually depends on which type of business you choose to set up. You may need to pay your taxes by making estimated tax payments.
  3. Employer Identification Number.  You may need to get an EIN for federal tax purposes. If you do need one, we can help you apply for it the correct way.
  4. Accounting Method.  An accounting method is a set of rules that determine when to report income and expenses. Your business must use a consistent method. The two that are most common are the cash method and the accrual method. Under the cash method, you normally report income in the year that you receive it and deduct expenses in the year that you pay them. Under the accrual method, you generally report income in the year that you earn it and deduct expenses in the year that you incur them. This is true even if you receive the income or pay the expenses in a future year.
  5. Employee Health Care.  The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit helps small businesses and tax-exempt organizations pay for health care coverage they offer their employees. A small employer is eligible for the credit if it has fewer than 25 employees who work full-time, or a combination of full-time and part-time. For 2015 and after, employers employing at least a certain number of employees (generally 50 full-time employees or a combination of full-time and part-time employees that is equivalent to 50 full-time employees) will be subject to the Employer Shared Responsibility provision.

For help with starting your business contact our office. We can guide you in planting the seeds and ensure you are growing the correct way. Call today – 800-560-4NFS.




Wrentham, Norfolk, Plainville, Franklin, Walpole, income tax, tax calculator, hr, irs forms, Jackson Hewitt, tax, tax act, tax return, tax brackets, income tax return, tax refund, taxes, accountant, h&r, tax return calculator, tax forms, free tax filing, federal income tax, federal tax forms, federal tax return, tax online, tax returns, online tax return, irs e file, tax return status, file taxes online, tax preparation, income tax return online, instant tax services, accountants, income tax filing, income tax forms, federal tax, estimate tax return, taxes online, online tax filing, tax services, federal taxes, what is income tax, tax filing, tax questions, online tax, e filing income tax, irs free file, free tax preparation, filing taxes, file taxes, state taxes, tax accountant, h and r, tax planning, free tax return, free federal tax filing, online taxes, free state tax filing, free online tax filing, federal income tax forms, tax help, free tax, how to file taxes, tax preparer, tax consultant, free taxes, income tax returns, complete tax, federal tax forms, free taxes online, income taxes, income tax return efiling, free efile, h&r, tax advisor, tax advice, best place to do taxes in wrentham, wrentham tax, wrentham tax planner, wrentham tax prep, wrentham income, wrentham income tax, wrentham accountant, wrentham accounting

Top Ten Tax Facts if You Sell Your Home

Do you know that if you sell your home and make a profit, the gain may not be taxable? That’s just
one key tax rule that you should know. Here are ten facts to keep in mind if you sell your home this year.

1. If you have a capital gain on the sale of your home, you may be able to exclude your gain from tax. This rule may apply if you owned and used it as your main home for at least two out of the five years before the date of sale.

2. There are exceptions to the ownership and use rules. Some exceptions apply to persons with a disability. Some apply to certain members of the military and certain government and Peace Corps workers.

3. The most gain you can exclude is $250,000. This limit is $500,000 for joint returns. The Net Investment Income Tax will not apply to the excluded gain.

4. If the gain is not taxable, you may not need to report the sale to the IRS on your tax return.

5. You must report the sale on your tax return if you can’t exclude all or part of the gain. And you must report the sale if you choose not to claim the exclusion. That’s also true if you get Form 1099-S, Proceeds From Real Estate Transactions. If you report the sale you should review the Questions and Answers on the Net Investment Income Tax on IRS.gov.

6. Generally, you can exclude the gain from the sale of your main home only once every two years.


7. If you own more than one home, you may only exclude the gain on the sale of your main home. Your main home usually is the home that you live in most of the time.

8. If you claimed the first-time homebuyer credit when you bought the home, special rules apply to the sale. For more on those rules see Publication 523.

9. If you sell your main home at a loss, you can’t deduct it.

10. After you sell your home and move, be sure to give your new address to the IRS. You can send the IRS a completed Form 8822, Change of Address, to do this.

Important note about the Premium Tax Credit. If you receive advance payment of the Premium Tax Credit in 2014 it is important that you report changes in circumstances, such as changes in your income or family size, to your Health Insurance Marketplace. You should also notify the Marketplace when you move out of the area covered by your current Marketplace plan. Advance payments of the premium tax credit provide financial assistance to help you pay for the insurance you buy through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Reporting changes will help you get the proper type and amount of financial assistance so you can avoid getting too much or too little in advance.

If you still need to do your 2014 taxes, please contact our office as we can still use IRS e-file through Oct. 15. You may also be interested in receiving one of our FREE “NFS Moving Day” packets to help you navigate through the home selling process. And also, we have a great network of realtors, appraisers, real estate attorneys and home inspectors so don’t hesitate to contact our office for a referral – 800-560-4NFS!





Wrentham, Norfolk, Plainville, Franklin, Walpole, income tax, tax calculator, hr, irs forms, Jackson Hewitt, tax, tax act, tax return, tax brackets, income tax return, tax refund, taxes, accountant, h&r, tax return calculator, tax forms, free tax filing, federal income tax, federal tax forms, federal tax return, tax online, tax returns, online tax return, irs e file, tax return status, file taxes online, tax preparation, income tax return online, instant tax services, accountants, income tax filing, income tax forms, federal tax, estimate tax return, taxes online, online tax filing, tax services, federal taxes, what is income tax, tax filing, tax questions, online tax, e filing income tax, irs free file, free tax preparation, filing taxes, file taxes, state taxes, tax accountant, h and r, tax planning, free tax return, free federal tax filing, online taxes, free state tax filing, free online tax filing, federal income tax forms, tax help, free tax, how to file taxes, tax preparer, tax consultant, free taxes, income tax returns, complete tax, federal tax forms, free taxes online, income taxes, income tax return efiling, free efile, h&r, tax advisor, tax advice, best place to do taxes in wrentham, wrentham tax, wrentham tax planner, wrentham tax prep, wrentham income, wrentham income tax, wrentham accountant, wrentham accounting

How the IRS Resolves an Identity Theft Case

The IRS has responded to criticism from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration and the National Taxpayer Advocate, among others, that resolution of identity theft accounts takes too long by increasing its measures to flag suspicious tax returns, prevent issuance of fraudulent tax refunds, and to expedite identity theft case processing. As a result, the IRS’s resolution time has experienced a moderate improvement from an average of 312 days, as TIGTA reported in September 2013, to an average of 278 days as reported in March 2015. (The 278-day average was based on a statistically valid sampling of 100 cases resolved between August 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012.) The IRS has recently stated that its resolution time dropped to 120 days for cases received in filing season 2013.

Even with a wait time of 120 days, taxpayers who find themselves victims of tax refund identity theft likely find the road to resolution a frustrating and time consuming process. This article seeks to explain the various pulleys and levers at play when communicating with the IRS about an identity theft case.

Initiating an ID Theft Case

A taxpayer may become aware that he or she is a victim of tax-related identity theft when the IRS rejects their tax return because someone has already filed a return using the taxpayer’s name and/or social security number. A taxpayer may also receive correspondence directly from the IRS that informs them, prior to filing, that someone has filed a suspicious return under their information. In other cases, a taxpayer may have had his or her identity information compromised and wishes to alert the IRS as to the possibility that he or she may be targeted by an identity thief.

For all such cases, the IRS has created Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit. Taxpayers who are actual or potential victims of tax-related identity theft may complete and submit the Affidavit to ensure that the IRS flags the tax account for review of any suspicious activity. Taxpayers who have been victimized are asked to provide a short explanation of the problem and how they became aware of it.

The Identity Theft Affidavit may also be submitted by taxpayers that have not yet become victims of tax-related identity theft, but who have experienced the misuse of their personal identity information to obtain credit or who have lost a purse or wallet or had one stolen, who suspect they have been targeted by a phishing or phone scam, etc. The form asks these taxpayers to briefly describe the identity theft violation, the event of concern, and to include the relevant dates.

Once the Form 14039 has been completed and submitted, the taxpayer should expect to receive a Notice CP01S from the IRS by mail. The Notice CP01S simply acknowledges that the IRS has received the taxpayer’s Identity Theft Affidavit and reminds the taxpayer to continue to file all federal tax returns.

IDVerify.irs.gov


The IRS has implemented a pre-screening procedure for suspicious tax returns. Rather than halt the refund process entirely, which can prevent a refund claimed on a legitimately filed return, the IRS has provided taxpayers with the opportunity to verify their identity.

Now when the IRS receives a suspicious return, it will send a Letter 5071C or Notice CP01B to the taxpayer requesting him or her to either visit idverify.irs.gov or call the toll-free number listed on the header of the letter (1-800-830-5084) within 30 days. When the taxpayer does this, the taxpayer will encounter a series of questions asking for personal information. If the taxpayer fails to respond to the verification request or responds and answers a question incorrectly the IRS will flag the return as fraudulent and follow the prescribed procedures for resolving identity theft cases.

Resolving the Case

After a tax return has been flagged with the special identity theft processing code, the IRS will assign the case to a tax assistor. TIGTA reported that the IRS assigns each case priority based first on its age and then by case type—for example, with cases nearing the statute of limitations placed first, followed by cases claiming disaster relief, and then identity theft cases. However, TIGTA has reported that cases are frequently reassigned to multiple tax assistors, and there are often long lag times where no work is accomplished toward resolution. National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson also noted in her recent “Identity Theft Case Review Report” on a statistical analysis of 409 identity theft cases closed in June 2014 that a significant number of cases experience a period of inactivity averaging 78 days.

After Resolution

The IRS has also created the Identity Protection Personal Identification Number (IP PIN) project, which is meant to prevent taxpayers from being victimized by identity thieves a second time after the IRS has resolved their cases and closed them. The IP PIN is a unique six-digit code that taxpayers must entered on their tax return instead

The IRS assigns an IP PIN to a taxpayer by sending him or her a Notice CP01A. Generally this Notice is issued in December in preparation for the upcoming filing season. The taxpayer then enters it into the appropriate box of his or her federal tax return (i.e. Forms 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ or 1040 PR/SS). On paper returns, this box is located on the second page, near the signature line. When e-filing, the tax software or tax return preparer will indicate where the taxpayer should enter the IP PIN, social security number or taxpayer identification number (TIN) at time they file their tax return. The IP PIN is only good for one tax year.

Taxpayers who have been assigned an IP PIN, but who have lost or misplaced it cannot electronically file their tax returns until they have located it. Previously such taxpayers had no way to retrieve their IP PIN and had to file on paper. Beginning on January 14, 2015, however, taxpayers who had lost their IP PINs were able to retrieve them by accessing their online accounts and providing the IRS with specific personal information and answer a series of questions to verify identity.

Latest Breach

The IRS announced on May 26th that 100,000 taxpayers became victims of a new identity theft scheme discovered in mid-May 2015. Identity theft criminals used stolen personal identification information to access the IRS’s online “Get Transcript” application and illegally download these taxpayers’ tax transcripts. The IRS is concerned that the criminals intend to use taxpayers’ past-year return information to file false tax returns claiming tax items and refunds that look legitimate and that do not trigger the IRS’s filters for finding suspicious returns.

Within this latest breach of security, identity thieves had attempted to download a total of 200,000 transcripts, but had only been successful half of the time, according to an announcement by IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. Because the IRS has yet to see how many taxpayers were actually victimized, the IRS may not provide IP PINs to all of these 200,000 taxpayers. However, the 100,000 taxpayers whose tax transcripts were downloaded will receive free credit monitoring services at the IRS’s expense, Koskinen stated.

For help in working on your identity theft case with the IRS, we are available at 800-560-4NFS (4637).

Wrentham, Norfolk, Plainville, Franklin, Walpole, income tax, tax calculator, hr, irs forms, Jackson Hewitt, tax, tax act, tax return, tax brackets, income tax return, tax refund, taxes, accountant, h&r, tax return calculator, tax forms, free tax filing, federal income tax, federal tax forms, federal tax return, tax online, tax returns, online tax return, irs e file, tax return status, file taxes online, tax preparation, income tax return online, instant tax services, accountants, income tax filing, income tax forms, federal tax, estimate tax return, taxes online, online tax filing, tax services, federal taxes, what is income tax, tax filing, tax questions, online tax, e filing income tax, irs free file, free tax preparation, filing taxes, file taxes, state taxes, tax accountant, h and r, tax planning, free tax return, free federal tax filing, online taxes, free state tax filing, free online tax filing, federal income tax forms, tax help, free tax, how to file taxes, tax preparer, tax consultant, free taxes, income tax returns, complete tax, federal tax forms, free taxes online, income taxes, income tax return efiling, free efile, h&r, tax advisor, tax advice, best place to do taxes in wrentham, wrentham tax, wrentham tax planner, wrentham tax prep, wrentham income, wrentham income tax, wrentham accountant, wrentham accounting